Post by: Jason Moore

GenericScience

Commentary Value in the web of life, or, Why world history matters to geography

21 Nov , 2017  

Abstract
Critical geography as a field has yet to reckon with a fundamental geographical blind spot: the historical- geographical patterns of capitalism as a whole. There has been a steady—and studied—reluctance to grapple with capitalism as a historical-geographical place. A geography of value relations must proceed from the unities-in-diversity of
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GenericScience

A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things (Introduction)

22 Okt , 2017  

 Raj Patel and Jason W. Moore, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2017.
 … Settled agriculture, cities, nation-states, information technology, and every other facet of the modern world has unfolded
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documentation, GenericScience

Metabolisms, Marxisms, & Other Mindfields

27 Sep , 2017  

he turbulence of the 21st century poses a serious analytical challenge: How does capitalism develop through nature, and not just act upon it? Try drawing a line around the “social” and “environmental” moments of financialization, global warming, resurgent fundamentalisms, the rise of China – and much beyond. The exercise quickly ...

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GenericScience

Nature, Geopower, & Capitalogenic Appropriation

20 Aug , 2017  

The rise of capitalism flowed through a new praxis: not only of Cheap Labor, but of Cheap Nature. After 1450, land productivity gave way to labor productivity as the metric of wealth. It was an ingenious civilizational strategy. New value-oriented technics – crystallizations of tools and ideas, power and nature

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EconoFiction

The Myth of the ‘Human Enterprise’: The Anthropos and Capitalogenic Change

15 Jun , 2017  

Humans are distinctive. No one is arguing the point. But how do we think through that distinctiveness? How do our conceptualizations lead us to highlight some relations over others, and how do those in/visibilities conform to – and challenge – extant structures of power (Bourdieu and Wacquant 1992; Sohn-Rethel 1978)? ...

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Biopolitics, EconoFiction

Name the System! Anthropocenes & the Capitalocene Alternative

13 Jun , 2017  

The Anthropocene has become the most important – and also the most dangerous — environmentalist concept of our times. It is dangerous not because it gets planetary crisis so wrong, but because it simultaneously clarifies ongoing “state shifts” in planetary natures while mystifying the history behind them (Barnosky et al.

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Biopolitics, GenericScience

Metabolic Rift or Metabolic Shift? Dialectics, Nature, and the World-Historical Method

2 Okt , 2016  

…That influence brought Marx’s socio-ecological imagination to a wider audience. But success came at a price. Influenced by Foster’s reading of social metabolism as a rift of “nature and society” – rather than society-in-nature – Marx’s ecological thinking came to be narrowly understood, more or less cordoned off from the ...

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GenericScience

Beyond the ‘Exploitation of Nature’? A World-Ecological Alternative

24 Jul , 2016  

Is nature exploited? “Of course!” says the environmentalist. But what might this mean? And, more significantly, is it so? Might there be a better way see the relations between humans and the rest of nature?

On the one hand, “exploitation” is often used by red-green scholars as a moral slogan, ...

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GenericScience

Wasting Away: Value, Waste, and Appropriation in the Capitalist World-Ecology

8 Mrz , 2016  

The decisive violence imposed on life by the capitalist mode of production derives from its quest for radical simplification. The dream, the fantasy, the nightmare of capital is its practical desire — practical, yet impossible — for world of interchangeable parts, in which one part of nature easily substitutes for ...

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GenericScience

The Origins of Cheap Nature: From Use-Value to Abstract Social Nature

22 Feb , 2016  

Modernity’s law of value is an exceedingly peculiar way of organizing life in a civilization. Born in the midst of the rise of capitalism after 1450, the law of value enabled an unprecedented historical transition: from land productivity to labor productivity as the metric of wealth and power. It was ...

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documentation, EconoFiction

Capitalism in the Web of Life: an Interview with Jason W. Moore

7 Okt , 2015  

Partway through Capitalism in the Web of Life, Jason W. Moore provides the imperative for a complete theoretical reworking and synthesis of Marxist, environmental, and feminist thought by asserting: “I think many of us understand intuitively – even if our analytical frames lag behind – that capitalism is more

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