GenericScience

Bemerkungen zu: A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things (Moore/Patel) – (1)

7 Dez , 2017  

Wir liefern hier einen kurzen Abriss zu dem neuen Buch von Jason W. Moore und Raj Patel “A History of The World in Seven Cheaps Things”. Strittige Punkte benennen wir, können sie aber hier nicht weiter ausführen.

Die theoretischen Begründungen, welche die von Moore/Patel analysierten billigen Dinge (Natur, Geld, Arbeit, ...

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GenericScience

NATURE/SOCIETY & THE VIOLENCE OF REAL ABSTRACTION

7 Dez , 2017  

Among Nature/Society dualism’s essential features is the tendency to circumscribe truth-claims by drawing hard-and-fast lines between what is Social and what is Natural.[1] Here is a rift: an epistemic rift.[2] At its core is a series of violent abstractions implicated in the creation and reproduction of two separate epistemic domains: ...

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GenericScience

A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things (Introduction)

22 Okt , 2017  

 Raj Patel and Jason W. Moore, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2017.
 … Settled agriculture, cities, nation-states, information technology, and every other facet of the modern world has unfolded
...

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Documentation, GenericScience

Metabolisms, Marxisms, & Other Mindfields

27 Sep , 2017  

he turbulence of the 21st century poses a serious analytical challenge: How does capitalism develop through nature, and not just act upon it? Try drawing a line around the “social” and “environmental” moments of financialization, global warming, resurgent fundamentalisms, the rise of China – and much beyond. The exercise quickly ...

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GenericScience

Beyond the ‘Exploitation of Nature’? A World-Ecological Alternative

24 Jul , 2016  

Is nature exploited? “Of course!” says the environmentalist. But what might this mean? And, more significantly, is it so? Might there be a better way see the relations between humans and the rest of nature?

On the one hand, “exploitation” is often used by red-green scholars as a moral slogan, ...

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