PhiloFiction

What is it to Live and Think like Gilles Châtelet?

18 Nov , 2018  

– What is To Live and Think Like Pigs about?

[Châtelet:] It’s a book about the fabrication of individuals who operate a soft censorship on themselves…In them, humanity is reduced to a bubble of rights, not going beyond strict biological functions of the yum-yum-fart type. . .as well as the ...

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PhiloFiction

The Immanence of Truths

20 Okt , 2018  

I’m told that Alain Badiou’s L’immanence des vérités has recently appeared in Parisian bookstores. I look forward to ordering a copy, and am reposting here my initial intuitions about the book, published last spring on e-flux, both as an invitation to think further about Badiou — unquestionably the most interesting

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NonPolitics

1968-2018: plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose(?)

28 Aug , 2018  

A working (and incomplete) draft of my talk for the ‘’68 & its Double-binds’ conference (University of Kent)

[intro]

50 years on and who would have thought that France’s very own Christophe Castaner (Minister for Parliamentary Relations) would be the one to mark the occasion and set the mood. For ...

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NonPolitics

Au Revoir Aux Enfants… de Mai! (Abstract)

5 Jun , 2018  

In the December of 1968, Maurice Blanchot issued a warning that was to be repeated in the years to come: “May, a revolution by idea, desire, and imagination, risks becoming a purely ideal and imaginary event if this revolution does not…yield to new organization and strategies.”[1] And ...

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Biopolitics, Documentation

ALAIN BADIOU AND THE SANS-PAPERS

29 Mai , 2018  

At the turn of the century there were more migrants than ever before in recorded history. Today, there are over 1 billion migrants. Each decade the percentage of migrants as a share of total population continues to rise and in the next twenty-five years the rate of migration is predicted ...

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Biopolitics

The End of the Monarchy of Sex’: Sexuality and Contemporary Nihilism

2 Aug , 2017  

Abstract:

The hegemonic form of contemporary queer theory is dependent on a model of desire as autonomous and deregulated, derived from post ’68 French theory and particularly the work of Michel Foucault. Such a model is at risk of finding itself in congruence with a deregulated post-Fordist capitalism that recuperates

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PhiloFiction

One, Two, Three, Four

7 Jun , 2017  

What are the most philosophically important numbers? Heidegger evokes the fourfold; Deleuze and Guattari a thousand (but it could have been more). For Badiou, the multiple plays its role, as does infinity. For Hegel the triad and the operation of the negative. For Irigaray it is sometimes two, and sometimes

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GenericScience

Mathification

6 Apr , 2017  

I’ve been returning frequently in recent weeks to that momentous section from Being and Event where Alain Badiou marshals all his poetic and persuasive powers. I refer to the important meditations Twenty-Six and Twenty-Seven and the “impasse of ontology” described therein, the crux of the book if not the crux

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PhiloFiction

Badiou’s Gauntlet

18 Jul , 2016  

Badiou’s Gauntlet, the challenge that Badiou issues to any kind of philosophy, is that the categories are three. No more than three, but also no less than three. Badiou’s Gauntlet is that there are bodies and languages, but also truths.

The challenge permeates all of Badiou’s work. One particularly clear

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Lexicon, PhiloFiction

Is Badiou a Digital Philosopher?

13 Mai , 2016  

tl;dr the answer is: 0, 0, 1, 0, and 1. (That’s no, no, yes, no, and yes.)

As with many questions of this nature — where both the vocabulary and the material are subject to interpretation — the answer depends a great deal on how one defines “digital” and how ...

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NonPolitics

Badiou’s Jurisprudence: The Event of Law and The Law of The Event

4 Jan , 2016  

In a lecture published in the Cardozo Law Review in 2008, Alain Badiou articulates his understanding of Being, Event, and Simulacrum in relationship to Logic and Law. With an incredible power of precision, Badiou reminds his audience of Aristotle’s three main pillars of the process of thought (Identity, non-​contradiction, and ...

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